Last updated on Thursday, 11 August 2005

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Ofarril, Oscar (1988- )
Born in Mexico. Forward.
International Career : Played for Mexico (Junior) 2003-04.
Club Career : Played for San Jeranimo.
Medals : Won World Championship (Junior U18) Division III gold in 2003-04.
Off Ice Officials
The game officials who are not positioned on the ice but play an important role in assisting the referee. They include the scorer, game timekeeper, penalty timekeeper, and goal judges.
Offence
The team controlling the puck or on the attack.
Offensive Line
A trio of forwards - normally Left-wing, Centre and Right-wing.
Offensive Zone
For the team attacking the goal, the area between the blue line and the goal line is the offensive or attacking zone. 
Office Depot Center
Sunrise, Florida, USA. Formerly known as the National Car Rental Center.
Home ice for : Florida Panthers
Capacity : 19,250
Ice pad size : 200 feet x 85 feet
"Official Guide of the Amateur Hockey Association of the United States"
i. A book edited by Donald M Clark, published in 1973 by the Amateur Hockey Association of the United States in Cumberland, Maryland, USA.
ii. A book edited by Donald M Clark, published in 1975 by the Amateur Hockey Association of the United States in Cumberland, Maryland, USA.
Officials' Signals
Standardised signals for referees and linesmen were introduced to the NHL in the 1956-57 season. They were not in general use in the UK until the early 1970s. They were gradually introduced by Ray Shilling who had been the designated 'home' referee in the early season games of London Lions in the Autumn of 1973.  The first IIHF rulebook to illustrate officials' signals was the 1972-73 edition -  the season when the signals came into force.
i. Boarding - the official pounds the closed fist of one hand into the open palm of the other hand.
ii. Charging - the official rotates his clenched fists around one another in front of his chest.
iii. Cross Checking - the official makes a forward and backward motion with his clenched fists, extending from his chest.
iv. Delayed Calling of Penalty - the official raises one arm straight out above his head and points to the penalized player with the other arm.
v. Delayed Off-side (Slow Whistle) - the official raises his "non-whistle arm" straight out above his head.  If play returns to the neutral zone without stoppage of play he puts his arm down the instant the puck crosses the line.
vi. Elbowing
- the official taps the elbow of "the whistle hand" with the palm of the opposite hand.
vii. Gross Misconduct - the official places both hands on his hips several times and points at the penalized player.
viii. High-sticking - the official clasps holds both clenched fists, one above the other, at the side of his head.
ix. Holding - the official clasps the wrist of "the whistle hand" with his other hand well in front of his chest.
x. Holding the Stick - the official clasps the wrist of the whistle hand with his other hand and then motions holding an imaginary stick in front of his waist.
xi. Hooking
- the official makes a tugging motion with both arms, as if he is pulling something towards him.
xii. Icing - the official folds his arms across his upper chest.
xiii. Interference - the official crosses his arms at the wrist, with his fists clenched, in front of his chest.
xiv. Kneeing - the official slaps his knee with the palm of his hand.
xv. Misconduct - the official places both hands on his hips and points at the penalized player.
xvi. Roughing - the official makes a thrusting motion extending his arm from his side with his fist clenched.
xvii. Slashing - the official makes a chopping motion with the edge of one hand across the opposite forearm.
xviii. Spearing - the official makes a jabbing motion with both hands thrust out in front of his body.
xix. Timeout - from 1990 official uses both hands to form a "T" in front of his chest.
xx. Tripping - the official strikes his right leg with his right hand below the knee - keeping both skates on the ice (prior to 1985 the official would extend his right leg forward, clear of the ice and strike his right leg with his right hand below the knee).
xxi. Unsportsman-like Conduct - since 1990 the official places both hands on his hips - as for misconduct (before 1990 both hands were used to form a "T" in front of his chest).
xxii. Wash-out (disallowed goal) - the official swings both arms laterally across his body with both palms facing downwards.
xxiii. Wash-out (disallowed icing or off-side) - the official extends both arms away from his body at shoulder level with both palms facing downwards.
Officials' Uniform
NHL referees and linesmen wore shirts with black and white vertical stripes for the first time in the 1954-55 season. The first official to wear the stripes in the UK is thought to be Ray Shilling, in the early 1970s.
Official's Wearhouse, The [web site]
Fairport, New York, USA. A Retail/Mail-order Company specialising in Hockey Referee Equipment and Apparel.
Offside
A team is offside when any attacking player crosses the blue line before the puck. The puck must always cross the blue line before an attacking player may enter the offensive zone. All players from the attacking team must have skate contact with the neutral zone at the instant the puck crosses the blue line. A face-off just outside the blue line results from an offside call.
"Offside" [web site Finnish]
The name of a Finnish hockey site devoted to the SM-liiga and EHL. Features include results, standings and news.
Offside Pass
The IIHF changed the offside rules from the 1998-99 season negating the offside pass - before that, an offside pass occurred when a member of the attacking team passed the puck from behind his own blue line to a team mate who was beyond the centre red line.

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